Florida Medical Clinic Cardiology

14320 Bruce B Downs Blvd.

Tampa, Florida 33613

Tel: 813.344.0934

Fax: 813.355.5020

2727 W M.L.K. Jr Blvd Ste 760,

Tampa, Florida 33607

Tel: 813.344.0934

Fax: 813.355.5020

Copyright @ 2017-2022. All rights reserved

Cardiovascular Nutrition

Nutritarian Diet

June 19, 2018

The aim: Lose weight, keep it off and reach peak health – without counting calories – through whole-plant and nutrient-rich foods.

The claim: Break out the salad bowl: Filling up with plant-based, nutrient-dense, disease-fighting superfoods, while limiting animal protein and processed choices – even olive oil – resets and retrains your palate to savor more natural, healthier foods. You’re empowered to reach your ideal weight while warding off heart disease, diabetes, some cancers and autoimmune conditions. And you could live to be 100.

 

The theory: Through his six books on healthful eating, including the 2011 “Eat to Live: The Amazing Nutrient-Rich Program for Fast and Sustained Weight Loss,” Dr. Joel Fuhrman, a family physician and president of the Nutritional Research Foundation, builds his program on findings from more than two decades of research on which foods and diets are most effective for promoting health and longevity.

The Ornish Diet

May 26, 2017

The aim: Variable. Can be tailored to losing weight, preventing or reversing diabetes and heart disease, lowering blood pressure and cholesterol, and preventing and treating prostate or breast cancer.

The claim: It's scientifically proven to make you "feel better, live longer, lose weight and gain health."

The theory: The more you change your diet, the more health benefits you reap. If you're only looking to lose a few pounds, a couple of this-for-thats might do the trick. But if you want to reverse heart disease – which research shows may be possible at the rigorous end of this diet's spectrum of choices – you're looking at big changes. For most programs, though, you have plenty of room between all and nothing. If you indulged yesterday, make more healthful choices today; if you didn't have time for a run yesterday, make it a must-do today. What matters most is your overall approach – if it's doable and pleasurable over the long haul, you'll stick with it for life.

What Is a Whole-Food, Plant-Based Diet?

February 10, 2018

A whole-food, plant-based diet is centered on whole, unrefined, or minimally refined plants. It’s a diet based on fruits, vegetables, tubers, whole grains, and legumes; and it excludes or minimizes meat (including chicken and fish), dairy products, and eggs, as well as highly refined foods like bleached flour, refined sugar, and oil.

We know that’s a mouthful! Rest assured, though, that you’ll be eating in a way that people have thrived on for thousands of years. We believe that you will find—as we do—that the diet and foods are very tasty and satisfying. Following are the food categories from which you’ll eat, along with a few examples from each. These include the ingredients you’ll be using to make familiar dishes, such as pizza, mashed potatoes, lasagna, and burritos:

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Cardiovascular Exercise

American Heart Association Recommendations for Physical Activity in Adults

January 21, 2016

Being physically active is important to prevent heart disease and stroke, the nation’s  No. 1 and  No. 5 killers. To improve overall cardiovascular health, we suggest at least 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise (or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity). Thirty minutes a day, five times a week is an easy goal to remember. You will also experience benefits even if you divide your time into two or three segments of 10 to 15 minutes per day.

For people who would benefit from lowering their blood pressure or cholesterol, we recommend 40 minutes of aerobic exercise of moderate to vigorous intensity three to four times a week to lower the risk for heart attack and stroke.

This includes things like climbing stairs or playing sports. Aerobic exercises benefit your heart, and include walking, jogging, swimming or biking. Strength and stretching exercises are best for overall stamina and flexibility.

The simplest, positive change you can make to effectively improve your heart health is to start walking. It's enjoyable, free, easy, social and great exercise. A walking program is flexible and boasts high success rates because people can stick with it. It's easy for walking to become a regular and satisfying part of life.

Being active when you have heart disease

August 22, 2016

Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is important.

Exercise can make your heart muscle stronger. It may also help you be more active without chest pain or other symptoms.

 

Exercise may help lower your blood pressure and cholesterol. If you have diabetes, it can help you control your blood sugar.

 

Regular exercise can help you lose weight. You will also feel better.

 

Exercise will also help keep your bones strong.

Always talk with your health care provider before starting an exercise program. You need to make sure the exercise you would like to do is safe for you. This is especially important if:

  • You recently had a heart attack.

  • You have been having chest pain or pressure, or shortness of breath.

  • You have diabetes.

  • You recently had a heart procedure or heart surgery.

Physical activity improves quality of life

March 02, 2015

Do you want to add years to your life? Or life to your years?

Feeling your best boosts your zeal for life!

The American Heart Association recommends at least 150-minutes of moderate activity each week. An easy way to remember this is 30 minutes at least 5 days a week, but three 10-minute periods of activity are as beneficial to your overall fitness as one 30-minute session. This is achievable! Physical activity may also help encourage you to spend some time outdoors.

Here are some reasons why physical activity is proven to improve both mental and physical health.

Physical activity boosts mental wellness.


Regular physical activity can relieve tension, anxiety, depression and anger.

You may notice a "feel good sensation" immediately following your physical activity, and most people also note an improvement in general well-being over time as physical activity becomes a part of their routine.

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